Creatively altering my world!

Your awesome Tagline

197,335 notes

tamorapierce:

foxandwhat:

littlefoxling:

fury-oh-sea:

um.

WHEN SHE WON HER BOYFRIEND SCALED THE TOWER TO JOIN HER AND SHE HUGS HIM AND SAYS “I DID IT” IN THE CUTEST LITTLE KID VOICE EVER it’s the best.

LET IT BE KNOWN SHE IS ONLY 5 FOOT TALL! MEN WITH HUGE ARM SPANS FAILED AT TASKS SHE SUCCEEDED AT! I LOVE HER! 

she warms the cockles of my old and hardened heart!

(Source: sizvideos)

47 notes

Anonymous asked: Do people giving birth still start in a labor room and have to get moved to a delivery room? (Hospital births only, of course.) What's that like? Can't you just stay in one place the whole time for comfort's sake?

themidwifeisin:

So in the olden days, you would labor up until pushing in one room, then be wheeled into a special “delivery room” with tools and machines and bright lights and lots of metal in order to push and “be delivered.”

We definitely don’t do that anymore.  All the hospitals I’ve ever worked in have had people laboring and delivering in the same room.  On the one hand it’s nicer for the patient, but on the other hand it’s also easier for the hospital, providers, nurses, and janitorial staff.

These are some pretty traditional hospital labor and delivery rooms:

image

They all have a hospital bed for the laboring person, a warmer for the baby, chairs and sometimes couches for family and friends.  They also have lights for midwives/doctors, monitors and computers for nurses and providers to check while in with the patient, IV poles, and oxygen tanks.

While hospital beds aren’t as lovely as your cozy bed at home, they are nice for some things, for example the fact that they’re electronic, and can move into all sorts of different positions.

They have attachable squat bars to help with squatting, pulling, or pushing.

They can be brought into an upright position for sitting upright or kneeling against.

Above is what we call the “Throne” position - it’s great for tired laborers who want to still be upright, but are running out of strength.  It can even support people with an epidural who want to be upright or even squat with the epidural running.

<3
Chloe

317,370 notes

shorm:

thebobblehat:

geekinallitsglory:

sashaalexanderisalesbianatheart:

judgingitsilently:

krazieleylines:

typicalpony:

How awesome does this sound though. You get infinite money and once a week you get to take a child to a candy store or toys or us or somewhere they love and buy them as much they want this would be fun given the kid wasn’t a brat.

There is no downside to this at all

This is the best, because it says A CHILD, not your child, so I could pick one of the really poor kids on the streets and go “Your life is going to change right now”, and I could buy everything their family might need, along with a house, a food supply, toys, clothes, and everything they never had the chance to have before. And the best thing is that I could do this with lots of children, and not just one. I could give a lot of children in need a full week of Christmas basically and maybe give them a chance to have a different life. That would be great.

Bless u ^ humanity still exists. 

Plus depending on how you define “child”, you could be helping high students who struggling with application fines and even pay for college tuition, room and board, or books

I’m good with this button.

And it’s *at least* a full week. You could do this full-time.

shorm:

thebobblehat:

geekinallitsglory:

sashaalexanderisalesbianatheart:

judgingitsilently:

krazieleylines:

typicalpony:

How awesome does this sound though. You get infinite money and once a week you get to take a child to a candy store or toys or us or somewhere they love and buy them as much they want this would be fun given the kid wasn’t a brat.

There is no downside to this at all

This is the best, because it says A CHILD, not your child, so I could pick one of the really poor kids on the streets and go “Your life is going to change right now”, and I could buy everything their family might need, along with a house, a food supply, toys, clothes, and everything they never had the chance to have before. And the best thing is that I could do this with lots of children, and not just one. I could give a lot of children in need a full week of Christmas basically and maybe give them a chance to have a different life. That would be great.

Bless u ^ humanity still exists. 

Plus depending on how you define “child”, you could be helping high students who struggling with application fines and even pay for college tuition, room and board, or books

I’m good with this button.

And it’s *at least* a full week. You could do this full-time.

(Source: honeyipwnedthekids, via korimonsterspapercock)

351,272 notes

hermionemollycharliepond:

just-raowolf:

edenwolfie:

my year 8 students had to do a budgeting activity pretending they were living out of home on $2000 a month and I find this written on there help I can’t fucking breathe

We had to do this and I was partnered with a boy whose parents are a scientist and a doctor. My family spawned the book: Top Drawer Villain - autobiography of a London criminal.
First of all, we had to choose where we would shop. He wanted to buy from Booths. “We are not buying from Booths," I snapped. "Get on Asda’s website right now." His face froze.
“A-Asda?" he whispered. "But that’s where… The Lower Classes shop.”
This was a good start.
We then had to decide on a menu. We started on breakfast. “Toast," he said.
“Toast," I said. "Great. Look, Asda has its own wholemeal—”
“Warburton’s thick-slice white bread. Nothing else. With olive oil.”
“You WHAT?" I choked. "You have olive oil, on your toast, in the morning?”
He frowned. “Who doesn’t?”
“Okay," I said, "but what will the children eat?”
He gaped at me. “The children? We have children?”
We continued. All was well until it came to what we would have on our sandwiches. We even sorted out the children’s lunch - they, of course, would get free school meals. “Yes," he agreed; "if we can’t even afford Bertolli then they can get school meals on the government.”
He asked what dressing we should have on our ham. “Nuh-uh," I said. "Can’t have ham. I’m vegetarian.”
“But I’m not.”
“Yes, but we’re married and we can only afford one sandwich filler so it has to be vege—”
“We’re married!?”
“Of course we’re married! You’re devout Christian - how do you think I convinced you to have children?”
He shook his head, frowning. “Well I want ham. You’ll have to put back the washing powder - I need ham on my sandwiches.”
We continued. Finally, it was dinner. “Okay," he said, clearly thinking hard; "for dinner, we can have… Chicken nuggets and… Beans?”
“Vegetarian.”
“Vegetarian nuggets then. And beans.”
“We need vegetables. The children have to have a balanced diet.”
“You and your children!" he yelled, and the whole class looked around.
“They’re your children too!" I screamed back.
He leapt to his feet, shaking his head and looking distraught. “I don’t believe it - I don’t believe you! I wouldn’t have your children!”
“Please," I cried, standing up also. "Don’t—”
“I want a divorce!”
And he walked out of the classroom.
The teacher stood up and stared between me and the door through which he had vanished. “I’m sorry," I whispered, "but we couldn’t do it any more. There were just too many differences - I can’t live with someone who thinks champagne is a budget.”
I can’t wait to see this guy when he gets to university.

READ THE WHOLE THING

hermionemollycharliepond:

just-raowolf:

edenwolfie:

my year 8 students had to do a budgeting activity pretending they were living out of home on $2000 a month and I find this written on there help I can’t fucking breathe

We had to do this and I was partnered with a boy whose parents are a scientist and a doctor. My family spawned the book: Top Drawer Villain - autobiography of a London criminal.

First of all, we had to choose where we would shop. He wanted to buy from Booths. “We are not buying from Booths," I snapped. "Get on Asda’s website right now." His face froze.

A-Asda?" he whispered. "But that’s where… The Lower Classes shop.

This was a good start.

We then had to decide on a menu. We started on breakfast. “Toast," he said.

Toast," I said. "Great. Look, Asda has its own wholemeal—

Warburton’s thick-slice white bread. Nothing else. With olive oil.

You WHAT?" I choked. "You have olive oil, on your toast, in the morning?

He frowned. “Who doesn’t?

Okay," I said, "but what will the children eat?

He gaped at me. “The children? We have children?

We continued. All was well until it came to what we would have on our sandwiches. We even sorted out the children’s lunch - they, of course, would get free school meals. “Yes," he agreed; "if we can’t even afford Bertolli then they can get school meals on the government.

He asked what dressing we should have on our ham. “Nuh-uh," I said. "Can’t have ham. I’m vegetarian.

But I’m not.

Yes, but we’re married and we can only afford one sandwich filler so it has to be vege—

We’re married!?

Of course we’re married! You’re devout Christian - how do you think I convinced you to have children?

He shook his head, frowning. “Well I want ham. You’ll have to put back the washing powder - I need ham on my sandwiches.

We continued. Finally, it was dinner. “Okay," he said, clearly thinking hard; "for dinner, we can have… Chicken nuggets and… Beans?

Vegetarian.

Vegetarian nuggets then. And beans.

We need vegetables. The children have to have a balanced diet.

You and your children!" he yelled, and the whole class looked around.

They’re your children too!" I screamed back.

He leapt to his feet, shaking his head and looking distraught. “I don’t believe it - I don’t believe you! I wouldn’t have your children!

Please," I cried, standing up also. "Don’t—

I want a divorce!

And he walked out of the classroom.

The teacher stood up and stared between me and the door through which he had vanished. “I’m sorry," I whispered, "but we couldn’t do it any more. There were just too many differences - I can’t live with someone who thinks champagne is a budget.

I can’t wait to see this guy when he gets to university.

READ THE WHOLE THING

(via shelly808)

168,818 notes

shadesofnerdness:

dawngyocry:

I’m not saying it’s fair, or even possible to try to care about every person or demographic. All I’m begging for is that we at least try not to be so hateful.

I think this is exactly what those people trying to argue against me need to see.

(via shelly808)